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Researchers Generate Immune Cells to Create Cancer Vaccines

Posted by Rebecca James on Aug 15, 2018 1:00:00 PM

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015.  Cancer arises from the transformation of normal cells into tumor cells in a multistage process that generally progresses from a pre-cancerous lesion to a malignant tumor.  With so many patients and families affected by cancer, research in this area is a constant source of interest.

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Biosimilars:  Growing Pains in a New Arena

Posted by Rebecca James on Aug 10, 2018 3:41:42 PM

One of the key strategies for enhancing access to affordable medicines posed by the Trump administration involved establishing the pathway for the development and approval of high-quality biosimilar therapies.  Yet, out of 11 approved products, only three biosimilars are on the market eight years after the enactment of legislation streamlining the process.  If current trends continue, it may be months or years before Americans gain access to these medications.

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New Research on Spinal Cord Injury

Posted by Shelly James on Jul 25, 2018 1:00:00 PM
The spinal cord is very sensitive to injury, and unlike other parts of your body, lacks the ability to self repair when damaged, making spinal injuries potentially devastating. A spinal cord injury — damage to any part of the spinal cord or nerves at the end of the spinal canal (cauda equina) — often causes permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions below the site of the injury.  An injury can occur when there is damage to the spinal cord from trauma, restriction of blood supply, or compression from a  tumor  or infection. There are approximately 12,000 new cases of spinal cord injury each year in the United States, most frequently in males.
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Preventing CTE & Head Trauma

Posted by Rebecca James on Jul 20, 2018 3:21:00 PM

Football is an iconic American sport, but despite the national interest in watching football, professional athletes experience a lack of protection when it comes to brain injuries. It is not uncommon for football players at any level to experience a traumatic head injury at some point during their career. For some, the injuries come in the form of a concussion, which makes up 7.4% of all head injuries sustained from playing football.

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Topics: ethics, social issues, legal, sports

Long Acting Treatment for Schizophrenia May Offer New Hope

Posted by Rebecca James on Jul 18, 2018 9:30:00 AM

 

Schizophrenia, Latin for "split mind," is a chronic, severe and disabling brain disorder, affecting an estimated 2.4 million American adults and their families.  The hallmark of schizophrenia is disorganized thinking, which can manifest as positive symptoms (hallucinations and delusions) and negative symptoms (depression, blunted emotions and social withdrawal).  Although schizophrenia is not as common as other mental disorders, the symptoms can be very disabling. In the past, there were different classes of schizophrenia, also known as 'subtypes'. Disorganized schizophrenia, catatonic schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder have since been absorbed into the larger diagnosis of schizophrenia, but are still used to describe the widely varied ways schizophrenia can manifest from person to person. 

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Right To Die

Posted by Rebecca James on Jul 13, 2018 10:30:00 AM

The right to die issue – or death with dignity – as it has been named in the press and by advocacy groups, is a controversial topic. On one side of the argument some people are concerned that passing ‘death with dignity’ statutes and legalizing suicide might expose the most vulnerable groups of people in society. On the other side, some people suffering terminal illness are concerned with exercising their right to bodily autonomy, and deciding when and where that ends.

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Topics: ethics

Psychopathy as a Disability?

Posted by Rebecca James on Jul 6, 2018 1:00:00 PM

Psychopathy is a hotly debated topic in the psychiatric community and in society at large. The nature of psychopathy is a frightening one and the root causes of the personality disorder are largely unknown. A person who is diagnosed as being a psychopath may exhibit symptoms such as reckless spending, violence towards animals and arson, ordinarily starting from a very young age. Psychopathy is generally understood by most people to be characterized by diminished capacity for empathy towards other people and living beings.

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Topics: mental health

SUPPORT for Patients and Communities

Posted by Rebecca James on Jun 29, 2018 11:00:00 AM

In ongoing attempts to fight the spread of opioid addiction, legislation was passed in The House on June 22, 2018. The legislation gives federal agencies more power to prevent deadly synthetic opioids such as fentanyl from crossing into the country, as well as providing increased resources for addicts.

The legislation, named SUPPORT for Patients and Communities, is expected to have a monumental impact on the way we approach opioid medication. The expectation is that ultimately the number of opioid painkiller prescriptions given out will be reduced dramatically and that development of alternative painkillers with less potential to be damaging or harmful will be accelerated.

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Topics: opioid epidemic, social issues, opioid crisis, legal, opioids, heroin

Massachusetts vs. Purdue Lawsuit & HEAL Initiative

Posted by Rebecca James on Jun 19, 2018 2:00:00 PM

image of law textsThe opioid crisis has been growing for a long time, and it appears to have come to a head with a sudden rush of fentanyl making its way into recreational drugs and heroin overdoses rising – especially in poor, rural areas.

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Topics: opioid epidemic, ethics, lawsuit, opioid crisis, legal, opioids

Regrowing Teeth? Recent Research Says Yes

Posted by Rebecca James on Jun 18, 2018 9:30:00 AM

A visit to the dentist is an anxiety provoking experiencee; dental anxiety and phobia are extremely common.  An estimated 9% to 15% of Americans avoid the dentist because of anxiety, and even with the recent advances in dental technology, an astonishing 91% of Americans between 20 and 64 years of age are affected by dental caries.

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Topics: dentistry